9:30   Colour
Petula. . .
and Friends

starring Petula Clark
who invites you to join her in a
special Christmas programme
with guests
Warren Mitchell
Rolf Harris
Manitas de Plata
and JOHNNY HARRIS
AND THE ORCHESTRA

Personal accompanist
FRANK OWENS

Script BARRY TOOK, BONNIE CASS
Costume designer PETER SHEPHERD
Sound HUGH BARKER
Lighting RITCHIE RICHARDSON
Designer LESLEY JOAN BREMNESS
Producer YVONNE LITTLEWOOD

   


Petula Clark:
Boxing Day (Monday)
BBC1 Colour

Petula Clark, who makes, music with some friends in a television special, talks to Russell Miller
'THE
TOGETHERNESS
I DISCOVER
AT CHRISTMAS'

PETULA CLARK and her husband/manager Claude Wolff live in a spacious house over- looking the lake at Geneva in Switzerland. It has 20 rooms, a music room in the basement and a beautiful garden with a swimming pool.
     Despite this, Mr and Mrs Wolff lead amazingly ordinary lives. She has never been cast in the mould of the flamboyant show-biz star lady ` and still isn't. He is a cheerful, handsome, tousle-haired Frenchman who provides the business acumen as her manager as well as being a devoted husband and father.
     They're nuts about each other and crazy about their daughters (Katie, eight and Barbara, ten) who go to the International School in Geneva


There's no cook, no
nurse, no one else at all,
I send them all home'
-------------------




'Christmas evening is really great. We go out and play in the snow'
---------------------------------
and are consequently completely bilingual.
     At Christmas it's just me, Claude and the kids,' says Petula. `There's no cook, no nurse, no one else at all. I send them all home and take over everything myself, including the cooking. We open our presents after lunch, then we clear up all the mess and drive up to Megeve, a ski resort just over the bor- der in France.
     We stay in a very small hotel, which is by no means smart but is just a groovyplace to stay. There is always a mixture of ordinary families and a show-business crowd staying there, but it
works and always has.
     `Christmas evening is really great. We go and play in the snow and it is very gay. The show-business sort of crowd mix in with the family crowd and it all gets very wild.
     `Boxing Day we start skiing - if we are capable - and we normally stay up there until New Year's Eve when we come home and have a big party.'
      She smiles at the prospect, then switches back to children and schools.
      `Actually a very important part of Christmas for me now is not all that, but the party at the
children's school before they break for the holidays
      'Because of the United Nations, there are children from all over the world, and of all colours, at the school. On the last day before Christ- mas they put on a little show. There are no lights in the room and all the children, dressed in white, come in carrying candles. Then they sit round and tell stories about their dif- ferent countries and sing in dozens of different languages.
      `It's quite incredible, the feeling of brotherhood and to- getherness you get there. That is what Christmas should be.'

RADIO TIMES DATED 16/23 DECEMBER 1971


with Musical Director Frank Owens