in rehearsal for Guest in the House
Petula's first big dramatic TV role.

The Goal:
January 25, 1957                                                                               TV TIMES

Petula Clark gets her big dramatic chance

For years petula Clark has been craving for TV drama--with the accent on drama. She has wanted an acting role where she can prove that she isn't just a "sweet little girl."
    Now she's got her chance. In Thursday evenings's Television Playhouse presentation, Guest in the House, Pt has been cast by Granada TV as a frail, neurotic and possessive young woman.
     She has been the darling of the British public since she starred--aged 13--with Sid Field in the film musical London Town But of recent years--she is now 24--she has shown a little impatience if people hint that she shouldn't grow up.
     She has said:
    "What do you want--short socks and pigtails until I qualify for false teeth?"
    "I simply can't go on being a sweet little girl any longer. I'd like to be a spitfire--or even somebody horrid."
     And she told me: "I want to show everybody I can act as well as sing."
    It looks as if this part is just about the best opportunity she could have.
    The authors of Guest in the House, Hagar White and Dale Eunson, apparently accept that certain types of women are natural enemies and in their play have engineered a clash of these instinctive antagonisms.
     In their dawing of the character that Pet is to play is the general feminine opinion; that they have also quite clearly accepted what I'm told the more angelic and naive a woman appears on the surface, the more diabolically cunning she may be.
     Pet, of course, has had serious roles before. "But never an important one on TV," she says. She has made 24 films, most in lightish roles.

Exceptions were a nurse in White Corridors and a neurotic woman in That Woman Opposite, yet to be released. On stage she had a meaty part in The Constant Nymph.
     When I talked to Pet she made this point: "I started out with the intention of becoming an actress. When I was seven I went to see Flora Robson in Mary Tudor at Streatham. I decided right then that I was going to become an actress--but I used my singing to get into show business."
     Now she's older she finds that appearing in public is considerably more frightening than when she was a child: "Nowadays I have to think a little bit more about things. Life certainly doesn't get any less complicated as you grow older."
     There's one thing Pet wants to make clear. This acting bug of hers does not mean that she wants to stop singing.
     "I would like to be able to combine the two, singing and acting. It isn't easy. But my idol, Frank Sinatra, has proved that it can be done."
     I reminded Pet that by the time Guest in the House is screened ITV may have a potential audience of ten million viewers.
     How does she feel about so many people witnessing her bid?
     "I don't like to think about that," said she.

The Cast and Story:
8.0                                       Time signal
TELEVISION PLAYHOUSE
Granada presents
PETULA CLARK
HECTOR ROSS       JOYCE HOWARD

in
GUEST IN THE HOUSE
by
Hagar Wilde and Dale Eunson
Adapted by Ken Hoare
Cast in order of appearance
Lee Proctor......................Janette Phillips
Ann Proctor......................Joyce Howard
Miriam.............................Patricia English
Douglas Proctor..................Hector Ross
Aunt Martha.......................Estelle Brodie
Evelyn......................................Petula Clark
Dan Proctor.........................Arthur Gross
Mr. Dow.........................Jefferson Clifford
Mrs. Dow................................Grace Webb
Dr. Shaw...............................Philip Vickers
Produced and directed by
SILVIO NARIZZANO
Into the happy home of Ann and Douglas comes a guest--Evelyn, a beautiful, charming semi-invalid. From the moment of her arrival the tensions and mistrusts in this household are suddenly released.
A Granada TV Network Production


The Reviews:
Daily Herald
Petula Clark, the popular singer with the large expressive eyes, achieved her ambition last night--to star in a television drama. In an ITV production of "Guest in the House" by Hagar Wilde and Dale Eunson, she had a part well suited to her fragile type. She was a semi-invalid girl whose appeal to the protective instinct in men nearly wrecked a home. She had to look lovely and innocent while a nasty little mind was scheming trouble for others. She threw fits of rage, fear and self-pity with complete abandon. Petula can certainly act.

Daily Mirror
Petula Clark revels in a well-earned reputation as a songstress. But last night she blossomed forth as a lunatic actress. . . The play established her as a player with everything that it takes. Timing, technique, theatre-sense, sensitivity--Pet's got 'em all. She's rung a new bell resoundingly. . .

Daily Express
Pet threw tearful tantrums and heart attacks in Granada's thunder and lightening, love-by-hate story. Pet put everything she had into Granada's mixed-up invalid trying to wreck a happy home. Powerful stuff, shot in close-up. Pet acted like mad--as she had to--splendidly.